Tuesday, April 20, 2010

I am a woman, not an imbecile!

I just stepped out of a conference panel in violent anger. Why?
Because it was so offensive!

To set the stage, it was a technology conference - and nothing
terribly related to the topic at hand. There was a panel on stage with
5 tech types from large and small companies.

Someone told a cute story about their daughter. One of those that
makes everyone go awwwww.... In a "wow, kids have no idea how life
worked before facebook" way. Cute.

And then, they launched into their wives.

I love the internets because my wife can figure out how to upload
photos and I don't have to do it when I come home from work!

Uh. Oooookaaaay.

It got worse.

I keep explaining to my wife not to hit "remember password" on other
people's computers because then they can get into her email! But she
didn't get it till something bad happened.

I left. Seriously?? Not only do I have a hard time believing these
wives are that stupid, but who are they to marry these alleged idiots?
And even if they did - who disparages publicly the woman they chose to
marry?

Dear goodness. This explains the national divorce rate.

--
Sent from my mobile device

2 comments:

Capt. BS said...

This is where "stepping out" of a panel is too polite a gesture. This is an occasion where abruptly standing up, glaring at the panelists, and storming off while knocking over as many tables/chairs/posters is merited. Or, more civilly, standing up, glaring at the panelists, raising your hand, staying adamantly put until they cede the floor, and then speaking your mind in such a manner that all other women in attendance (hopefully there were other women in attendance???) are viscerally compelled to follow you out of the room.

It baffles me that, a decade into the 21st century, this crap still happens, and the perpetrators are completely oblivious to the role they play.

Priya said...

It sounds like these people didn't realize their behavior was offensive. The world is small though - hopefully you'll have the opportunity to tell this person about their bad behavior when you meet them at some point.